Artist Spotlight: David Parr

Posted by Carolina on Mar 17th 2017

David has been a vital part of our Artist Collective, since he joined in November of 2014. David is known for his unique eye creatures, which you can read about in the interview below:

What inspired your eye creatures?

It started by making a tree of wire and hot glue. I wanted something different to put on the top of it. I was the dollar store and I found a pack of Halloween eyeballs. I attached them to the top of the tree and it looked like Retinas. Nicole and some other people said I was really good at that and suggested I make some sculptures, so from there I made my first eye creature. It was a really big hit. I sold three eye creatures within a month. I try to get more and more creative with them and I haven’t made the same one more than once. They are all individually unique.

When did you make the first eye creature?

I think it was sometime in the Summer of 2015.

Tell me about some of the eye creatures you’ve made:

I have one, probably the first one that I was real serious about, I called him single and looking. It’s because he had one eye, flowers in his left hand and coffee in his right. He stood in this pose with his wings out and had this look on his face like, “Hey, baby, wassup?” People got such a huge kick out of him. He actually sold for $50. I started making more and more of them from there. I made on for Valentine’s called Eye Candy. I am also going to try to make one called Eye Love You.

When did the eye puns start?

Well, I’ve always been kind of punny … I thought it would make it that much better to have a creative name and the creature itself be creative.

Tell me about the big eye sculpture you’re making:

The big sculpture here—I don’t know what his name is yet, but I’ve been calling him Frank the Freak— someone suggested that I should make a giant version of the eye creatures I had been making. I have yet to figure out exactly what he is going to be. Originally it was going to be a woodland creature, like a treant or a spriggan like creature. He’s an experiment right now. I honestly don’t even know how to explain him. I just wanted to experience and see just how far my creativity could go with him. He’s not necessarily for sale at the moment, but I thought he could display where my creativity takes me and people could appreciate that. It definitely brings some attraction to the studio and that was actually my intention for it, to attract people to the studio. I gave him flexible hands so it could hold different things. He’s been PovA’s paint holder, paintbrushes, signs. He’s kind of the body guard here since he’s a 5’ 7” statue. He also scares people.

Do you have a goal for finishing him?

I wanted to have him finished a year ago. However, he had an unfortunate accident. I probably would have been finished with him by now, but then I happened to him. After the accident I almost gave up and I threw the whole statue outside. I said, “Screw it; I’m done with this.” The damage was so bad that I thought there was no way to fix it. Then I had this thought, “Just go for it anyway.” He’s made a comeback and I’m going to try to find ways to improve him instead of just giving up. After a major jaw ache and couple missing teeth for Frank the Freak, things are looking up. He still needs a lot of work, like a pair of pants and plastic surgery. I don’t have a set goal for completing him right now, but he had turned into a good project to have fun with and experiment on between projects.

Now Frank the Freak sits as an in-studio reminder to follow where an idea takes you and not to give up, even when you want to say, “Screw it; I’m done with this!”

Frank the Freak - Gold Text, New Pic.jpg

You can find David’s Eye Creatures along with other his other artwork in our Artist Marketplace: http://artistmarketplace.storenvy.com/collections/985554-david-parr. We are so thankful to have David in our Artist Collective! Please take some time to check out his work and stay tuned for contributions from our other artists!

Cheers,

Poverty & the Arts via Carolina Smith